Christchurch Daily Photo

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MOA Statue in Redcliffs by Andrew Lyons

July 16, 2016

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This Moa statue can be found in Redcliffs – just opposite the New World supermarket and in front of the old Mother Hubbard’s building. It was sculpted by Andrew Lyons of the Heathcote Valley Gallery (which is at 22 Station Road) and was commissioned by the building owner. The statue is very appropriate as moa hunters used to use the caves around Redcliffs and there have been Maori artefacts found within the caves. You can learn more about the history here http://nzetc.victoria.ac.nz/tm/scholarly/tei-BuiMoaH-t1-body-d0-d2-d1-d1.html

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Published on Saturday, July 16th, 2016, under Statues & Sculptures

5 Responses to “MOA Statue in Redcliffs by Andrew Lyons”

  1. Graeme Stanley says:

    Tears to my eyes Mother Hubbards from Armagh Street. I have never appreciated The Moa Statue Thank You.

  2. Quite a sculpture!

  3. Robert says:

    Love this very impressive Moa sculpture! Just curious what material (looks too heavy to be bronze) went into its construction? Thanks also for posting the link as it is right down my alley of interests and was most informative too!

    Perhaps a rhetorical question, or maybe not: Did they ever conclude whether the Moa hunters were people who predated the arrival of the Maori and then somehow vanished (or were assimilated?) or whether there was simply a cultural change during the long period of time between the extinction of the Moa and the arrival of Europeans who first met who are now the Maori? All said, Aotearoa is a long way for families (lost male fishermen can’t reproduce) to have arrived by boats so many centuries ago, long before the first Europeans set foot upon the land.

    • Michelle says:

      Asked Bruce about this and he said according to Michael Kings penguin history of new Zealand, after the moa became extinct food was short in supply and the inhabitants were forced into different modes of living.

      • Robert says:

        That’s kind of what I was suspecting. As for the lists of artefacts at the bottom of the article you linked, there was quite a brisk trade of raw materials going on throughout both the north and south islands even back in the times of the Moa hunters — that I find to be most impressive!